Currently set to No Follow

New Honeycomb Structure Design Can Absorb Severe Impact

It is capable of elastic buckling.


5
Share via
20 shares, 5 points
Share via

At the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas, researchers have developed a new energy-absorbing structure that follows the honeycomb structure pattern. The design, called negative stiffness (NS) honeycombs, is proved to withstand blunt impact and provide repeated protection from multiple impacts.

Improved honeycomb structure (Source: CockrellSchool)

Existing honeycomb technology, which can be found in automobiles and aircraft, features insular panels of repeating, hexagonal-shaped cells with different sizes and configurations. These conventional honeycombs, however, lose their protective properties in just a single impact because of the plastic buckling – not returning to their original shape once a compression is absorbed.

This is what NS sets apart from the conventional honeycomb. What was done by the researchers is to design a cell geometry that can buckle elastically rather than plastically, providing resilience to recover their energy-absorbing shape and properties after impact.


Improved honeycomb structure (Source: University of Texas)

A prototype was manufactured by the researchers which has cell dimensions of 3.5 inches. It has a force threshold level of 200 Newtons, but can absorb a 100 mph fastball in 0.03 seconds. It was made from nylon using selective laser sintering for experimentation.

The technology, once perfected, is useful in the automotive and military industry for protective hardware

Share via

Read more  How to Survive Engineering College: 10 Useful Tips

Like it? Share with your friends!

5
Share via
20 shares, 5 points
News Team

0 Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

I accept the Privacy Policy * for Click to select the duration you give consent until.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Send this to a friend